\d represents a digit; it is the same as using [0-9]. : grep « String « Ruby

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Ruby » String » grep 
\d represents a digit; it is the same as using [0-9].


# Similarly to ^, the shortcut \A matches the beginning of a string

opening = "This is a test. \nThis is a test. This is a test. ,\n"
opening.grep(/\Athis in/)

 
Related examples in the same category
1.Regular Expressions
2.match the first line just by using a word in the pattern
3.a pair of square brackets ([]) matches any character in the brackets
4.match alternate forms of a pattern using the pipe character (|)
5.Grouping uses parentheses to group a subexpression, like this one that contains an alternation
6.Anchors anchor a pattern to the beginning (^) or end ($) of a line
7.Similar to $, the shortcut \z matches the end of a string, not a line
8.Find out the phone number
9.? is a repetition operator
10.The plus sign (+) operator indicates one or more of the previous pattern
11.Braces ({}) specifies the exact number of digits, such as \d{3} or \d{4}
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