Get the numbers and relevance values of the books in which distributed appears in the summary. : MATCH « FullText Search « SQL / MySQL

Home
SQL / MySQL
1.Aggregate Functions
2.Backup Load
3.Command MySQL
4.Cursor
5.Data Type
6.Database
7.Date Time
8.Engine
9.Event
10.Flow Control
11.FullText Search
12.Function
13.Geometric
14.I18N
15.Insert Delete Update
16.Join
17.Key
18.Math
19.Procedure Function
20.Regular Expression
21.Select Clause
22.String
23.Table Index
24.Transaction
25.Trigger
26.User Permission
27.View
28.Where Clause
29.XML
SQL / MySQL » FullText Search » MATCH 




Get the numbers and relevance values of the books in which distributed appears in the summary.
     
mysql>
mysql> CREATE TABLE BOOKS(
    ->     BOOKNO INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    ->     AUTHORS TEXT NOT NULL,
    ->     TITLE TEXT NOT NULL,
    ->     YEAR_PUBLICATION YEAR NOT NULL,
    ->     SUMMARY TEXT NOT NULL
    -> )ENGINE = MyISAM;
Query OK, rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>
mysql> SET @@SQL_MODE = 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT';
Query OK, rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>
mysql> INSERT INTO BOOKS VALUES (1,
    -> 'Tom, Jack, Jane',
    -> 'January', 2007,
    -> 'January is the first month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars and one of seven months with the le
ngth '||
    -> 'of 31 days. The first day of the month is known as New Year\'s Day. It is, on average, the coldest month of the
year '||
    -> 'within most of the Northern Hemisphere (where it is the second month of winterand the warmest month of the yea
'||
    -> 'within most of the Southern Hemisphere (where it is the second month of summer). In the Southern Hemisphere, Jan
uary '||
    -> 'is the seasonal equivalent of July in the Northern Hemisphere.');
Query OK, row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>
mysql> INSERT INTO BOOKS VALUES (2,
    -> 'George, Jean and Tim ',
    -> 'History', 2005,
    -> 'January is named after Janus (Ianuarius), the god of the doorway; the name has its beginnings in Roman mythology
'||
    -> 'coming from the Latin word for door (ianua- January is the door to the year. Traditionally, the original Roman
 '||
    -> 'calendar consisted of 10 months, totalling 304 days, winter being considered a monthless period. Around 713 BC,
'||
    -> 'the semi-mythical successor of Romulus, King Numa Pompilius, is supposed to have added the months of January and
 '||
    -> 'February, allowing the calendar to equal a standard lunar year (365 days). Although March was originally the fir
st '||
    -> 'month in the old Roman Calendar, January became the first month of the calendar year either under Numa or under
'||
    -> 'the Decemvirs about 450 BC (Roman writers differ). In contrast, years in dates were identified by naming two con
suls,' ||
    -> 'who entered office on May and March 15 before 153 BC when they began to enter office on January 1.');
Query OK, row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>
mysql> INSERT INTO BOOKS VALUES (3,
    -> 'Rick',
    -> 'New Year\'s Day', 2007,
    -> 'The Romans dedicated this day to Janus, the god of gates, doors, and beginnings. The month of January was named
after '||
    -> 'Janus, who had two faces, one looking forward and the other looking backward. This suggests that New Year\'s '||

    -> 'celebrations are founded on pagan traditions. Some have suggested this occurred in 153 BC, when it was stipulate
d that '||
    -> 'the two annual consuls (after whose names the years were identifiedentered into office on that day, though no
consensus '||
    -> 'exists on the matter. Dates in March, coinciding with the spring equinox, or commemorating the Annunciation of J
esus, '||
    -> 'along with a variety of Christian feast dates were used throughout the Middle Ages, though calendars often conti
nued to '||
    -> 'display the months in columns running from January to December.');
Query OK, row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>
mysql> INSERT INTO BOOKS VALUES (4,
    -> 'Chris Date ',
    -> 'Gregorian calendar', 2004,
    -> 'The Gregorian calendar, also known as the Western calendar, or Christian calendar, is the internationally accept
ed '||
    -> 'civil calendar. It was introduced by Pope Gregory XIII, after whom the calendar was named, by a decree signed on
 24 '||
    -> 'February 1582, a papal bull known by its opening words Inter gravissimas. The reformed calendar was adopted late
'||
    -> 'that year by a handful of countries, with other countries adopting it over the following centuries. The motivati
on '||
    -> 'for the Gregorian reform was that the Julian calendar assumes that the time between vernal equinoxes is 365.25 d
ays, '||
    -> 'when in fact it is presently almost exactly 11 minutes shorter. The error between these values accumulated at th
'||
    -> 'rate of about three days every four centuries, resulting in the equinox occurring on March 11 (an accumulated er
ror '||
    -> 'of about 10 daysand moving steadily earlier in the Julian calendar at the time of the Gregorian reform. Since
the '||
    -> 'Spring equinox was tied to the celebration of Easter, the Roman Catholic Church considered that this steady move
ment '||
    -> 'in the date of the equinox was undesirable.');
Query OK, row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>
mysql> INSERT INTO BOOKS VALUES (5,
    -> 'Thomas, Carolyn and Mary',
    -> 'Lunar calendar',2005,
    -> 'The Catholic Church maintained a tabular lunar calendar, which was primarily to calculate the date of Easter, '|
|
    -> 'and the lunar calendar required reform as well. A perpetual lunar calendar was created, in the sense that 30 '||

    -> 'different arrangements (lines in the expanded table of epactsfor lunar months were created. One of the 30 '||
    -> 'arrangements applies to a century (for this purpose, the century begins with a year divisible by 100). When '||
    -> 'the arrangement to be used for a given century is communicated, anyone in possession of the tables can find '||
    -> 'the age of the moon on any date, and calculate the date of Easter.');
Query OK, row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>
mysql> CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX INDEX_TITLE ON BOOKS (TITLE);
Query OK, rows affected (0.01 sec)
Records: 5  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX INDEX_SUMMARY ON BOOKS (SUMMARY);
Query OK, rows affected (0.01 sec)
Records: 5  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql>
mysql>
mysql>
mysql> SELECT BOOKNO, MATCH(SUMMARYAGAINST ('Roman')
    -> FROM BOOKS;
+--------+----------------------------------+
| BOOKNO | MATCH(SUMMARYAGAINST ('Roman') |
+--------+----------------------------------+
|      |                                |
|      |                0.498949497938156 |
|      |                                |
|      |                0.201381713151932 |
|      |                                |
+--------+----------------------------------+
rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>
mysql> drop table books;
Query OK, rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>

   
    
    
    
    
  














Related examples in the same category
1.A MATCH expression for fulltext search can be used to order results.
2.Use MATCH in where statement
3.MATCH(TITLE) AGAINST ('to')
4.Using match in where clause
5.Using match in select statement
6.Using the same match...against clause in select clause and where clause
7.Matches two words
8.Matches two columns
9.Matches two columns in boolean mode
10.Match two words in boolean mode
11.Match against a long sentence
12.Get the numbers and titles of the books in which database appears in the title.
13.Get the numbers and titles of the books in which the phrase design implementation appears.
14.You can include additional criteria to narrow the search further.
15.Full-Text Search syntax
java2s.com  | Contact Us | Privacy Policy
Copyright 2009 - 12 Demo Source and Support. All rights reserved.
All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.